JITNEY – Extends through February 28

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Critics and audiences cannot stop talking about JITNEY! The Tampa Bay Times says it is “entertaining and worthwhile,” while Talkin’ Broadway raves that JITNEY is “quite possibly the best presentation of an August Wilson play I have seen by this company.”

Due to the incredible response performance for JITNEY will extend its run through February 28th.

EXTENSION WEEK ON SALE DATES:
Subscriber & Act 1 Club Presale – Tuesday February 2nd starting at 10AM* (call Box Office at 727-823-7529 for more information)
General Public On Sale – Wednesday February 3rd starting at 10AM

JITNEY:
The Ninth Installment in our Century Cycle

The American Stage tradition continues with this winner of the New York Drama Critics’ Award for “BEST NEW PLAY”. Set in 1977 at a makeshift taxi company in Pittsburgh’s Hill District, JITNEY is a beautiful addition to the August Wilson’s decade by decade cycle of plays about the black American experience in the twentieth century.

January 20 – February 21, 2016

Learn More About JITNEY

Book TicketsRead the rest

JITNEY – Audiences and Critics Agree

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Critics and audiences cannot stop talking about JITNEY! The Tampa Bay Times says it is “entertaining and worthwhile,” while Talkin’ Broadway raves that JITNEY is “quite possibly the best presentation of an August Wilson play I have seen by this company.”

Due to the incredible response performance for JITNEY will extend its run through February 28th.

EXTENSION WEEK ON SALE DATES:
Subscriber & Act 1 Club Presale – Tuesday February 2nd starting at 10AM* (call Box Office at 727-823-7529 for more information)
General Public On Sale – Wednesday February 3rd starting at 10AM

Check out what audiences are saying about August Wilson’s JITNEY, now playing at American Stage.

JITNEY:
The Ninth Installment in our Century Cycle

The American Stage tradition continues with this winner of the New York Drama Critics’ Award for “BEST NEW PLAY”. Set in 1977 at a makeshift taxi company in Pittsburgh’s Hill District, JITNEY is a beautiful addition to the August Wilson’s decade by decade cycle of plays about the black American experience in the twentieth century.

January 20 – February 21, 2016

Learn More About JITNEY

Book TicketsRead the rest

JITNEY – Behind the Scenes with Kim Sullivan

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“These kinds of stories will never become stale. We will always want villains, we will always want heroes, but who the heroes and villains are will surprise you.” -Actor, and American Stage regular, Kim Sullivan (Turnbo)

JITNEY:
The Ninth Installment in our Century Cycle

The American Stage tradition continues with this winner of the New York Drama Critics’ Award for “BEST NEW PLAY”. Set in 1977 at a makeshift taxi company in Pittsburgh’s Hill District, JITNEY is a beautiful addition to the August Wilson’s decade by decade cycle of plays about the black American experience in the twentieth century.

January 20 – February 21, 2016

Learn More About JITNEY

Book TicketsRead the rest

JITNEY – Trailer (2016)

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Take a look at our trailer for JITNEY written by August Wilson and directed by L. Peter Callender. The cast includes Satchel Andre, Mujahid Abdul-Rashid, Josh Goff, Jazmine Pierce, ranney, Adrian Roberts, Ron Bobb-Semple, Kim Sullivan, and Aaron Washington. For tickets and more info visit http://americanstage.org/jitney/.

JITNEY:
The Ninth Installment in our Century Cycle

The American Stage tradition continues with this winner of the New York Drama Critics’ Award for “BEST NEW PLAY”. Set in 1977 at a makeshift taxi company in Pittsburgh’s Hill District, JITNEY is a beautiful addition to the August Wilson’s decade by decade cycle of plays about the black American experience in the twentieth century.

January 20 – February 21, 2016

Learn More About JITNEY

Book TicketsRead the rest

Conversation with L. Peter Callender

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lpeter

JITNEY’s Director, L. Peter Callender, is the Artistic Director of the African-American Shakespeare Company in San Francisco, CA and comes to American Stage with an impressive resume of credits ranging from Broadway to work in England, France, and Japan.

Join L. Peter Callender and American Stage Producing Artistic Director Stephanie Gularte in conversation this Sunday (January 10th) at 1PM. $7 Subscribers | $10 General Public. Book Now.

What makes JITNEY unique in Wilson’s Century Cycle?

JITNEY, Wilson’s first play,  is the only of Wilson’s plays not to go to Broadway. Not because it wasn’t worthy, but because the producers got cold feet after the play before did’t do the expected ticket sales. An attempt to rectify that error is being made as we speak. Another aspect of it’s uniqueness is the play itself. Unlike MA RAINEY’S BLACK BOTTOM, JOE TURNER’S COME AND GONE, FENCES or PIANO LESSON, four of Wilson’s masterpieces, JITNEY’S genius is in its characters and Shakespearean-like poetry. The plot is a simple one, but Wilson shapes each character with a journey of yearning; a personal attempt to battle the forces that are trying to encroach on their world. He gives them all magnificently sculpted arias that emanate effortlessly from the hearts of these people and touch their listeners. In it’s earlier incarnation, JITNEY was 90 minutes long and needed work, Wilson put it aside determined to write a great play: MA RAINEY’S BLACK BOTTOM was the result. He then came back to JITNEY, took away characters, added the beautiful monologues, changes the year from 1971 to 1977 and presented the world with what I sincerely feel is his best play!

 

Do you anticipate any unique directorial challenges to working on JITNEY at American Stage?

Yes. Each stage, each space, has it’s challenges–physical or otherwise. American Stage presents a challenging audience perspective which I have to be always aware of as director. I am constantly on the move in rehearsals to make sure I am delivering the play to every part of the house and not cheating any audience member out of our beautiful work. It’s … Read the rest

3 Reasons Why ‘It’s A Wonderful Life’ at American Stage

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2015 was another ‘wonderful’ year for American Stage. As we reflect on the past 12 months and look forward to 2016, we wanted to celebrate some great successes that couldn’t have been accomplished without your support!

Visit americanstage.org/donate to support the Annual Fund.

Also! Don’t Miss:

IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE: A LIVE RADIO PLAY | Join Us December 19-27 | Limited Run
This beloved American holiday classic comes to captivating life as a live 1940s radio broadcast. With the help of an ensemble that brings a few dozen characters to the stage, and live, on-stage sound effects, the story of idealistic George Bailey unfolds as he considers ending his life one fateful Christmas Eve. BOOK NOW

IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE Performance Schedule:
Thursday, December 24 | 2PM
Thursday, December 24 | 7PM
Saturday, December 26 | 2PM
Saturday, December 26 | 7PM
Sunday, December 27 | 2PMRead the rest

Happy Holidays from IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE

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The cast of ‘It’s a Wonderful Life: a Live Radio Play’ has a special holiday wish just for YOU!

American Stage presents ‘It’s a Wonderful Life: a Live Radio Play’ | Now Playing through December 27

For More Information click here

This beloved American holiday classic comes to captivating life as a live 1940s radio broadcast. With the help of an ensemble that brings a few dozen characters to the stage, and live, on-stage sound effects, the story of idealistic George Bailey unfolds as he considers ending his life one fateful Christmas Eve.… Read the rest

THE 39 STEPS Extends Run! Now Playing through December 19!

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THE 39 STEPS | Extended through December 19
Due to popular demand, THE 39 STEPS has been extended until December 19. Don’t miss the show that has audiences dying of laughter and the Tampa Bay Times raving “You will laugh loudly and often, I promise.” BOOK NOW

Added Performances for THE 39 STEPS:
Wednesday, December 16 | 8PM
Thursday, December 17 | 8PM
Friday, December 18 | 8PM
Saturday, December 19 | 8PMRead the rest

Origins of the 39 Steps Part II

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ORIGINS OF THE 39 STEPS: PART II
In Which a Story Plays on the Silver Screen: Alfred Hitchcock & the Film
Shannon Hurst

Be sure to check out Part I of the Origins of the 39 STEPS series: In Which a Story Cures Boredom.

Known the world over as the supreme Master of Suspense, filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock received his famous moniker following the debut of his 1935 film The 39 Steps. Released at a time where cinematic audiences were again on the verge of another World War, the film served to bolster Hitchcock’s career—leading him directly to a contract in Hollywood—as well as to secure the popularity of spy-thrillers on the big screen.

Having read John Buchan’s The Thirty-Nine Steps in grade school, a young Alfred Hitchcock believed the thrilling, expansive adventure and unsuspecting, innocent action hero would serve well as the foundation of a great suspense film. Once the burgeoning director had completed his first spy film, The Man Who Knew Too Much, he would begin to work on re-crafting Buchan’s novel. Altering the story’s title to The 39 Steps, Hitchcock recrafted many of the details of Hannay’s journey to first make it more suitable for cinematic audiences, then on the verge of yet another World War, primarily by including the addition of the now-iconic femme fatale and “cool blonde” female characters, and also to heighten its elements of suspense, or perpetual state of anticipation. The result was not only a tremendous success for its director, but another raving success for the story of Richard Hannay.

Hitchcock’s work on The 39 Steps and his other spy-thrillers helped to shape his aesthetic that is now familiar to his contemporary audiences. One such creative element employed by Hitchcock in this film he would refer to as his “MacGuffin”—a plot key that is both critically important but utterly vague; Hannay learns from Annabella, a mysterious femme fatale, that there is such a thing as the 39 Steps and that they are dangerous and important, but leaves Hannay and his audiences to fill in any remaining blanks. The film is briskly-paced—another alteration … Read the rest