Category Archives: Jitney

JITNEY – Extends through February 28

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Critics and audiences cannot stop talking about JITNEY! The Tampa Bay Times says it is “entertaining and worthwhile,” while Talkin’ Broadway raves that JITNEY is “quite possibly the best presentation of an August Wilson play I have seen by this company.”

Due to the incredible response performance for JITNEY will extend its run through February 28th.

EXTENSION WEEK ON SALE DATES:
Subscriber & Act 1 Club Presale – Tuesday February 2nd starting at 10AM* (call Box Office at 727-823-7529 for more information)
General Public On Sale – Wednesday February 3rd starting at 10AM

JITNEY:
The Ninth Installment in our Century Cycle

The American Stage tradition continues with this winner of the New York Drama Critics’ Award for “BEST NEW PLAY”. Set in 1977 at a makeshift taxi company in Pittsburgh’s Hill District, JITNEY is a beautiful addition to the August Wilson’s decade by decade cycle of plays about the black American experience in the twentieth century.

January 20 – February 21, 2016

Learn More About JITNEY

Book TicketsRead the rest

JITNEY – Trailer (2016)

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Take a look at our trailer for JITNEY written by August Wilson and directed by L. Peter Callender. The cast includes Satchel Andre, Mujahid Abdul-Rashid, Josh Goff, Jazmine Pierce, ranney, Adrian Roberts, Ron Bobb-Semple, Kim Sullivan, and Aaron Washington. For tickets and more info visit http://americanstage.org/jitney/.

JITNEY:
The Ninth Installment in our Century Cycle

The American Stage tradition continues with this winner of the New York Drama Critics’ Award for “BEST NEW PLAY”. Set in 1977 at a makeshift taxi company in Pittsburgh’s Hill District, JITNEY is a beautiful addition to the August Wilson’s decade by decade cycle of plays about the black American experience in the twentieth century.

January 20 – February 21, 2016

Learn More About JITNEY

Book TicketsRead the rest

JITNEY – Behind the Scenes with Kim Sullivan

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“These kinds of stories will never become stale. We will always want villains, we will always want heroes, but who the heroes and villains are will surprise you.” -Actor, and American Stage regular, Kim Sullivan (Turnbo)

JITNEY:
The Ninth Installment in our Century Cycle

The American Stage tradition continues with this winner of the New York Drama Critics’ Award for “BEST NEW PLAY”. Set in 1977 at a makeshift taxi company in Pittsburgh’s Hill District, JITNEY is a beautiful addition to the August Wilson’s decade by decade cycle of plays about the black American experience in the twentieth century.

January 20 – February 21, 2016

Learn More About JITNEY

Book TicketsRead the rest

JITNEY – Audiences and Critics Agree

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Critics and audiences cannot stop talking about JITNEY! The Tampa Bay Times says it is “entertaining and worthwhile,” while Talkin’ Broadway raves that JITNEY is “quite possibly the best presentation of an August Wilson play I have seen by this company.”

Due to the incredible response performance for JITNEY will extend its run through February 28th.

EXTENSION WEEK ON SALE DATES:
Subscriber & Act 1 Club Presale – Tuesday February 2nd starting at 10AM* (call Box Office at 727-823-7529 for more information)
General Public On Sale – Wednesday February 3rd starting at 10AM

Check out what audiences are saying about August Wilson’s JITNEY, now playing at American Stage.

JITNEY:
The Ninth Installment in our Century Cycle

The American Stage tradition continues with this winner of the New York Drama Critics’ Award for “BEST NEW PLAY”. Set in 1977 at a makeshift taxi company in Pittsburgh’s Hill District, JITNEY is a beautiful addition to the August Wilson’s decade by decade cycle of plays about the black American experience in the twentieth century.

January 20 – February 21, 2016

Learn More About JITNEY

Book TicketsRead the rest

Conversation with L. Peter Callender

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lpeter

JITNEY’s Director, L. Peter Callender, is the Artistic Director of the African-American Shakespeare Company in San Francisco, CA and comes to American Stage with an impressive resume of credits ranging from Broadway to work in England, France, and Japan.

Join L. Peter Callender and American Stage Producing Artistic Director Stephanie Gularte in conversation this Sunday (January 10th) at 1PM. $7 Subscribers | $10 General Public. Book Now.

What makes JITNEY unique in Wilson’s Century Cycle?

JITNEY, Wilson’s first play,  is the only of Wilson’s plays not to go to Broadway. Not because it wasn’t worthy, but because the producers got cold feet after the play before did’t do the expected ticket sales. An attempt to rectify that error is being made as we speak. Another aspect of it’s uniqueness is the play itself. Unlike MA RAINEY’S BLACK BOTTOM, JOE TURNER’S COME AND GONE, FENCES or PIANO LESSON, four of Wilson’s masterpieces, JITNEY’S genius is in its characters and Shakespearean-like poetry. The plot is a simple one, but Wilson shapes each character with a journey of yearning; a personal attempt to battle the forces that are trying to encroach on their world. He gives them all magnificently sculpted arias that emanate effortlessly from the hearts of these people and touch their listeners. In it’s earlier incarnation, JITNEY was 90 minutes long and needed work, Wilson put it aside determined to write a great play: MA RAINEY’S BLACK BOTTOM was the result. He then came back to JITNEY, took away characters, added the beautiful monologues, changes the year from 1971 to 1977 and presented the world with what I sincerely feel is his best play!

 

Do you anticipate any unique directorial challenges to working on JITNEY at American Stage?

Yes. Each stage, each space, has it’s challenges–physical or otherwise. American Stage presents a challenging audience perspective which I have to be always aware of as director. I am constantly on the move in rehearsals to make sure I am delivering the play to every part of the house and not cheating any audience member out of our beautiful work. It’s … Read the rest